Adoption and the Red Thread


When a baby is born there is a red thread that connects him/her to all the people who will play part in that baby’s life. Over time, the thread will shorten and tighten, leaving the child with the people that s/he is meant to be with.   -Chinese Proverb

The proverb above is often quoted by those in the international adoption community, but it can apply just as easily to domestic adoption and step-families as well as traditional and non-traditional families.

If you would like to know more about adoption because you are interested in adopting, want to volunteer or work in the field, or just want to learn something new and interesting, here are some resources:


  1. “The Red Thread” by Ann Hood (c) 2010, W.W. Norton & Company, Inc. This is a fiction book about a group of people who go through the process of adopting from China together.  An excellent and interesting story, it is realistic and informative as well.  The author has adopted a daughter from China and based this work of fiction on her experiences.
  2. “Inside the Adoption Agency; Understanding Intercountry Adoption in the Era of the Hague Convention” (c) 2007 Universe, Inc. by Jean Nelson Erichsen, M.A., L.B.S.W. This is a non-fiction book.  Jean N. Erichsen co-founded & co-directed Los Ninos International Adoption Agency, an agency which operated from 1981-2009 here in The Woodlands, Texas. At the time the book was written, the international adoption process was undergoing massive change due to the Hague Convention. The laws have continued to evolve since that time, but the book is still worth reading because her heartwarming account from “inside” is fascinating and it is a good introduction to the Hague process.
  3. For Children: “A Mother for Choco” An excellent and beautiful picture book for children.
  4. The U.S. Department of State Webpage on Intercountry Adoption  International Adoption information from the Bureau of Consular Affairs – U.S. Department of State. This page contains latest news about visa processing, travel warnings, and country-by-country information.
  5. National Council for Adoption (NCFA) adoption resources and advocacy. You can sign up for a newsletter here, sign up for seminars, or learn where to volunteer.
  6. Adoptuskids.org:  About foster care and domestic adoption, in connection with the U.S. Children’s Bureau.  Resources to help you find U.S. children available for adoption, statistics and information about adoption and foster care.
There are many, many more resources, books, and websites.   Please feel free to comment with some of your favorites!  (All comments will be reviewed prior to posting).

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